News

The latest astronomical and RASC Toronto Centre news.
It's Sirius O'Clock: Astronomical Timekeeping in Ancient Egypt

Ever wondered how the Ancient Egyptians kept time? Well, Dr. Sarah Symons from McMaster University wondered about this too.

The Sky This Month March 27 - April 24 2019
The content for The Sky This Month presented by Arnold Brody at the Recreational Astronomy Night on March 27, 2019, including event dates and times, sky charts, and observing targets.
The Sky This Month March 27 - April 24 2019

Toronto Centre member Arnold Brody presented the upcoming month sky highlights from March 27 to April 24, 2019. He spoke at the Recreational Astronomy Night Meeting which was held at the Ontario Science Centre on March 27, 2019.

A Trip to Mars?

Ever wondered what it would take for humans to go to Mars? Well, Ron Macnaughton has given it much thought.

Katrina Ince Lum with Award

Each year the Toronto Centre recognizes the contributions of our members to the operation of the Centre, to the promotion of astronomy in the community, to observing programs and to the development of astronomical equipment.

Scattering Throughout the Solar System

On March 13, 2019 Brittney Cooper, an Earth and Space Science MSc candidate at York University, gave a presentation on scattering of light throughout the Solar System.

NASA - Apollo 16, 23 April 1972
June 28, 2019 - August 31, 2019
This exhibition celebrates the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing, and our enduring fascination with what lies beyond our atmosphere.
The Moon: A Voyage Through Time
March 9, 2019 - August 18, 2019
Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first human steps on the moon by discovering the wonder, knowledge, and beauty the moon has inspired through the ages.
2019-02-27 The Sky This Month

Despite the Recreational Astronomy Night meeting of February 27, 2019 being cancelled due to bad weather, Bryon Czarnik prepared a Sky This Month presentation for the month of March. Here is a PDF of that presentation.

Should Humans Go To Mars?

What can we learn with humans that the much safer robotic explorers cannot tell us? Is it worth the risk? Is there really any reason to go to Mars other than "because it's there?"

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